March Rose Growing Notes

by Marty Reich, Master Rosarian, Editor of the Rose Leaf

Pruning is on all rosarian minds right now. Should I or shouldn’t I, that is the question? These mild winters are confusing to both roses and rosarians. We used to say prune when the forsythia blooms, but there are newer varieties of forsythia which bloom perhaps too early. In the last Rose Leaf I talked about pruning Austins and climbers in February. I just pruned some shrubs as well. Last year I pruned my HTs and Fls March 16-18, did some touch-up pruning April 28 and the garden was in full bloom (climbers and all) May 14. That is a general plan for me again this year.

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February Rose Growing Notes

by Marty Reich, Master Rosarian, Editor of the Rose Leaf

Unpruned climber on trellis
Unpruned climber on trellis
Something you will want to do in February is to prune your David Austin roses. Dr. Rankin, who was a member for many years and grew a huge number of them, gave this advice: Prune and feed them in mid-February. Since I started doing this, it has seemed to make a difference from the years I waited until late March.

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Mentors Matter

by Ron Daniels, President – Nashville Rose Society, Master Rosarian, Master Gardner

 

As I look back on my experiences with growing roses for the last 28 years, I remember who introduced me to the love of roses and was kind enough to mentor me. This fine gentleman was John Curtis, or as NRS members referred to him, “The Rose Farmer”. He earned that name because of his commitment to organic methods of growing roses.
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Winterization of Roses

By Marty Reich, Master Rosarian

 
It is time to put the kids to bed. The last big rose chore before we get to put our feet up and enjoy the rose catalogs needs to be done by about the first week of December. A general rule is to wait until there have been two real (not just a couple of hours) freezes below 28degrees F. Protect too soon and the bush will not have time to gear up its internal winterization mechanism. This involves making its own kind of “antifreeze” and will not be discussed here.
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Roses: Back on the Menu with Insects

by David Cook, Davidson County Extension Agent with the UT Extension office of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture

 

Roses_Back_on_the_MenuDavid Cook’s presentation to the Nashville Rose Society is an excellent resource for the types of insects that attack our roses in Tennessee. He explains how to identify the culprit based on the damage to the plant, and gives organic solutions for dealing with them.

Click here for David’s presentation, “Roses: Back on the Menu”.

YOU Can Grow Roses: Eleven Steps to Growing Good Roses

by Jack Wedekind, Master and Consulting Rosarian

 

Jack-&-Betsy-Wedekind-containerGarden
Jack and Betsy Wedekind’s container garden with over 100 rose bushes
Many people seem to think that growing roses is just too difficult or time consuming. I will admit that it takes some work and commitment. But I have found it to be an extremely rewarding hobby. Our hobby that began with six rose bushes, over a few years, grew to a garden of over 100 bushes. My wife Betsy and I joined the Nashville Rose Society and the American Rose Society (rose.org), both non-profit organizations, and received lots of help and advice.

If you want some concise no-nonsense steps that will result in good roses, consider the following Eleven Steps to Growing Good Roses:
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The Magic of Refrigeration

by Jack Wedekind, Master Consulting Rosarian

Rose refrigerator
Jack and Betsy Wedekind’s 1928 GE Monitor Top Refrigerator
Two things I enjoy the most about being a rose grower are exhibiting in rose shows and sharing my blooms with others. I don’t have a huge number of rose bushes in comparison to many people I know. So how do I manage to take bouquets to our church every Sunday in the growing season and exhibit at a few rose shows? It’s the magic of our 1928 General Electric Monitor Top Refrigerator in the garage!
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“I ain’t got nuthin’ to show”

by Gene Meyer, NRS Consulting Rosarian

For the past two Nashville Rose Shows that’s been my refrain. Two years ago I had one nice Touch of Class. That was the best rose I had, I thought, for a chance to win. The judges thought otherwise. I had some mini’s I entered but no luck there. Right before I left home for the show I saw an open Mr. Lincoln so I cut it for the open bloom category. There must have been 30 roses entered in that class. I won! Now I believe that was pure unadulterated luck.
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Preparation Timeline for the Upcoming Rose Shows

By John Mueller, Editor, “Tampa Talks Roses”, April 2012
(Adapted for the Tenarky District Rose Shows)

 

Crescendo, hybrid tea
Crescendo, hybrid tea
Photo courtesy of Weeks Roses
The the local Societies of the Tenarky District of the American Rose Society host several Rose Shows each year. Schedules for the rose shows are on the district website at www.tenarky.org.

For our novice exhibitors, the following preparation timeline will be very helpful in your quest to garner your first blue ribbon or maybe even the Queen of Show! It has been done before!
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